DAILY WISCONSIN

History

The Problem with Monuments

Maybe we should agree that it is simply okay for us to remove the monuments which we deem as not aligning with our current agreed upon values, such as statues of Columbus, and then erect monuments which honor our beliefs and morals at this time. Future generations can decide if our choices were right for…

Sterling Hall Bombing, 50 Years Later

When a bomb tore through Sterling Hall 50 years ago, it also damaged University Hospital, which was across Charter Street. “I felt the heat, a flash of light lit the room, and the force threw me back across the foot of the patient’s bed,” a nurse recalls. https://t.co/ltCipGLsP6 — UW-Madison (@UWMadison) August 24, 2020  …

Centennial

100 years ago today, the #19thAmendment was ratified after decades and decades of struggle by brave women. Just as the fight for voting rights went on then, our fight continues today. #WomensVote100 pic.twitter.com/2v2bSwFalC — Sen. Tammy Baldwin (@SenatorBaldwin) August 18, 2020          

Unalike 

Nixon fully understood that word usage mattered and his insightful knowledge of foreign affairs along with his deep reading of books about world leaders underscored his appreciation for how things sounded when coming from elected officials.    It is worth mentioning that when Nixon wrote his books he would sit and read aloud his text and listen as the recording played back so he could differentiate the tone between the written and verbal.   From there he would work to craft a more precise final product.

Via Donald Trump Is Not Like Richard Nixon–Or Vice Versa @ CAFFEINATED POLITICS.

1968

The incumbent is a lame duck. The world is aflame; America’s inner cities are burning. Hillary Clinton is Hubert Humphrey, that uninspiring establishment candidate, challenged by a Gene McCarthy figure: idealistic but ungrounded, with no chance of success.

On the Right, demagoguery competes with competence. Like George Corley Wallace, one candidate appeals to nativist instincts. He courts violence with violent rhetoric. The rabble is easily roused.

Via ‘It’s time we stop, children; what’s that sound?’ – Blaska’s Bring It! – March 2016.

Widespread 

The photo showed six First Ladies walking together at the dedication of Ronald Reagan’s Presidential Library in 1991.  I posted it here on my blog and also on my Caffeinated Politics Facebook page.    There is no way I could know within hours that post would start to generate interest, shares, and conversation.   As of this posting there have been 13,583,894 people reached by the post and 1,625,445 engaged by the post.    With my humble attempt to honor the life of a former first lady my little blog went viral.  And in a major way.

The largest part of my FB audience for this post (24%) are women between the ages of 55-64.   87% of those who saw my post did so on a mobile device.

Via Caffeinated Politics Facebook Post Goes Viral—Over 13 Millions Views (Thus Far)! @ CAFFEINATED POLITICS.

Then, Now

At the turn of the 20th century, Wisconsin government was rife with corruption. Big business and wealthy plutocrats controlled the politicians and thus controlled the government. They had their puppet politicians pass laws that benefited them regardless of who might be hurt by them.

This high level of corruption gave way to a progressive movement led by Fighting Bob LaFollette. LaFollette, who was a Republican, led the way to clean up the government, enacting laws that returned the government to the control of the people. He led the way to busting trusts, enacting election reforms and creating the Wisconsin Idea. The changes brought on by LaFollette and other progressives have well served the people of Wisconsin for over a 100 years.

Via Wisconsin, I hardly recognize you! @ Cognitive Dissidence.

Three WISGOP Bills

One bill will gut the state’s campaign finance laws and retroactively decriminalize the secretive campaign finance schemes that Walker engaged in during the recall elections, opening the doors to new levels of dark money in state elections.

Another bill will cripple the the state’s nonpartisan Government Accountability Board–considered a model for other states–and turn it into a toothless, partisan agency. The board of nonpartisan retired judges will be replaced with partisan appointees that are guaranteed to gridlock (like the ineffective Federal Elections Commission), and gives the legislature power to cut funding for an investigation that it doesn’t like.

A third bill will prohibit Wisconsin’s John Doe statute, which was used to investigate Walker and is similar to a grand jury yet in front of a judge, from being used to investigate political corruption.

Via The Kochs Want to End WI’s Era of Clean Government @ PRWatch.

Recommended

I have now finished How Lincoln Learned To Read by Daniel Wolff and much enjoyed it from start to finish. As with a book of this type there is much to debate and ponder—agree with and disagree with—but one thing is for sure. Via “How Lincoln Learned To Read” @ CAFFEINATED POLITICS.